9 Top ELearning Trends for 2017

At the end of 2016 I was contacted by Bryan Jones from the site eLearning Art to provide my thoughts on what I believe to be the growing trends in our industry for the coming year. Mine were as follows:

  1. Social Learning
  2. Micro-Content
  3. Informal Learning

Not only did he ask me this question, but he also asked 48 other elearning experts the same.

Bryan vetted the responses and came up with a “top 9” list which he has put into the infographic you see above.

I was pleased to see that two of my three predictions made the list đŸ™‚ (Social Learning and Micro-Content). Though I would contend that number six sort of aligns with what I described as “informal learning”.

It appears that much of the industry has similar sentiments as to what the main trends are for elearning in the coming year.

It is also interesting looking at the predictions that made the list that I didn’t mention. I like the last one: interactions. This makes a lot of sense to me.

We see that elearning competes for people’s attention spans. If you don’t have interactions in your course content (getting the learner to engage with the content in some capacity) then they will drift.

Adding checkpoints and scenarios that matter will go a long way. By this I mean that what a learner does in the course dictates how they experience the rest of the course. I will be keeping an eye on this for 2017 and we could very well see it appear as a more prominent prediction in 2018.

Check out eLearning Art to read the full article (as well as all 49 elearning expert predictions).

Author

Justin Ferriman is the co-founder and CEO of LearnDash, the WordPress LMS trusted by Fortune 500 companies, major universities, training organizations, and entrepreneurs worldwide for creating (and selling) their online courses.

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4 Responses

  1. Thanks for posting this Justin. It’s worth thinking about. I agree with you that informal learning could be a top category. I also think much of what will eventually be useful in VR is still a few years away (this is the consensus in tech mags). What about the decline of learning management systems since social and informal and other tools are rising?

  2. Might I suggest allowing each expert 100 points to allocate across topics of the community’s choices?

    This allows much more flexibility for each to express degrees of preference more appropriate for the nuances of an expert viewpoint…informed by other experts, no less.

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