Interesting Flipped Classroom Statistics

flipped-classroom1Classrooms all over the world are being flipped – and with good reason. More and more studies are revealing that a flipped classroom environment is enhancing learning retention.

What is a flipped classroom?

The flipped learning approach involves taking direct instruction and placing the onus on the individual learner rather than group instruction. For example, taking an online course to learn the content. Classroom time is then spent applying the content rather than direct instruction.

Does it Work?

In short – yes. Evidence is building that supports a flipped model for teaching. Teachers are finding it useful as well as effective. Consider the following statistics:

  • In 2012, 48% of teachers flipped at least one lesson, in 2014 it is up to 78%
  • 96% of teachers who have flipped a lesson would recommend that method to others
  • 46% of teachers researched have been teaching for more than 16 years, but are moving towards flipped classrooms
  • 9 out of 10 teachers noticed a positive change in student engagement since flipping their classroom (up 80% from 2012)
  • 71% of teachers indicated that grades of their students have improved since implementing a flipped classroom strategy
  • Of the teachers who do not flip their classroom lessons, 89% said that they would be interested in learning more about the pedagogy

One important distinction to make about flipped classrooms is that not every subject needs to take on this approach. It is better to start with just one or two lessons. The traditional approach still has merit and should certainly be utilized. Consider the flipped approach as a creative way to supplement learning and foster student engagement with the content.

Sources:
Sophia.org
Flipped Learning Network

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About the Author:

Justin Ferriman is the co-founder and CEO of LearnDash, the WordPress LMS trusted by the world's leading organizations, such as the University of Michigan, Digital Marketer, WPEngine, and Infusionsoft. Justin has made a career as an elearning consultant where he has implemented large-scale training programs for Fortune 500 companies. Twitter | LinkedIn

4 Comments
  1. Joe Valentine

    As an adult educator (primarily desktop applications training), I find the concept of the flipped classroom…I guess “intriguing” is as good as any word. Although it’s not difficult to find lots of articles dealing with the concept (some written well, some not so well), there’s one thing that in my (admittedly limited) searching I haven’t been able to find. My concern is that the perceived effectiveness of the technique is really more about “newness.” While there are those who will claim that the idea isn’t really all that new, to most of us it’s a fairly radical change. But does it really work, or is it just new and different?

    I’m a lover of pizza, and not really a big fan of steak. But if you give me pizza for lunch and dinner every day for 6 months, a steak is going to seem VERY good. Even if it’s not a great cut and not really cooked the way I’d prefer, at least it’s not pizza.

    Although I have absolutely no real evidence to base this on, my feeling is that the concept of the flipped classroom is another tool in what needs to be a well-equipped educator toolbox. Like the other tools, it will work well for some material, in some circumstances, and with some people. In others…maybe not so much.

  2. Justin what a great article! I think one thing it does highlight is the amazing potential technology can offer. It’s an exciting new time to be in education, this methodology may not be master or perfect at present but it shows innovation is happening and change for the better can help learners and practitioners.

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