Impostor Syndrome and Online Courses

Creating an online course is a great way to supplement your income or possibly replace it altogether.

However, I have seen that there are people who start creating a course only to stop before it is even finished.

The reasons people give for not going through with their online course business are varied.

Some claim not to have enough time, others don’t believe they have enough budget, and then there are those who stop because they don’t see why anything would  purchase their course in the first place.

While we certainly could comment on the first two roadblocks I think it is important to address the last one.

Some people call this lack of confidence and others impostor syndrome. No matter the name it really is the prime example of self-sabotage.

What you must realize is that your experience, you knowledge, is valuable – and people pay good money for knowledge. Think about the formal education system. Tuition costs are soaring because institutions know that the education they provide means a better opportunity.

Your online course is no different.

Here is another way to look at it: you have spent years accumulating experiences and knowledge around your course topic. There are people who want to know what you know but without having to go through those same experiences. They want a shortcut and for someone to “cut the fat” and to teach them exactly what is important on a particular subject. People pay good money for this kind of convenience.

It is completely understandable to have doubts as you go about a new venture, but don’t sell yourself short. You don’t need to know all the answers before starting as you will learn as you go through the process.

Trust in yourself and experience. People buy courses from those who they perceive as confident.

Author

Justin Ferriman is the co-founder and CEO of LearnDash, the WordPress LMS trusted by Fortune 500 companies, major universities, training organizations, and entrepreneurs worldwide for creating (and selling) their online courses. Twitter | LinkedIn

1 Response

  1. Hello Justin,
    I just read your article the ‘Imposter Syndrome’ – an appealing name by the way. This behavior is also familiar for me when I gave ‘in-person’ workshops in the early years of the Office IT boom.
    Please, are you willing to share your own experience in dealing with this phenomenon. How can i ‘counter- attack’ this attitude. I already use e-mail-automation to cheer up spirits in between lessons. Do you have any more suggestions how to keep students focussed?

    Cordially
    Harald Borjans

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