WordPress LMS Poll Results

A few days ago we administered a quick poll to those interested in the WordPress LMS project.  The one question poll asked users to indicate how they would prefer to WPLMS to be offered: as a one-time download vs. a hosted solution.

The reason behind this poll was to get a better idea of what people want.  Below are the results:

    • 325 responses
    • 76% prefer to download the LMS
    • 24% prefer WPLMS to host/customize the LMS

Given the result of this poll, it seems logical that we offer both options.  Had the results been trending more towards one way (i.e. 90% for download), we would focus the majority of our efforts on that offering.

Lastly, a big thank you to those of you who wrote in with suggestions and/or questions.  We appreciate hearing your opinions as we march forward with the project.

Have a great weekend!

Author

Justin Ferriman is the co-founder and CEO of LearnDash, the WordPress LMS trusted by Fortune 500 companies, major universities, training organizations, and entrepreneurs worldwide for creating (and selling) their online courses. Twitter | LinkedIn

10 Responses

  1. Justin,

    Perhaps in a couple of weeks you could give us an update on the status and progress made with WPLMS?

    Thanks..

  2. Justin,

    Would August/September 2012 be the time to expect WPLMS?
    I am on Moodle right now, but it doesn’t feel like the right thing for me. I hope that WPLMS is more like WP: easy to style and adapt.

    Thanks in advance

  3. Hey all-

    In regards to the status of release. There is a meeting next week to discuss scope and timeline so there should be a better idea then. As this project has taken life there has been a lot of feedback from the learning and design community. As a result, it’s important for us to create something of value, rather than rush a sub-par product.

    If you cannot wait and need something right now, send me a note (using the contact page) indicating what it is you are trying to do and I can probably suggest some alternative resources.

    Thank you all for your interest.

    -Justin

  4. Justin,

    At first, I thought the project was not such a great idea, thinking moodle was all anyone needed. As I use Moodle, I find it very problematical with few support options.

    I have the following suggestions.

    1. Keep it simple from a user perspective. Have an easy, simple way to do things like quizzes and testing – where everything is default optioned correctly. Underlying complexity and customization is fine, but with Moodle, the simplest tasks are a head ache.

    2. Control your versions. WordPress is easy to upgrade, make the LMS easy to upgrade. Moodle suffers from multiple, uncontrolled versions, each one of which seems to have a different menu structure. I would recommend you support the latest version and maybe one version back. And keep the support forums clean. When, I try to find out how to do something in Moodle 2.1, I can usually only find an answer for 1.6.

  5. Thanks for the quick update Justin. I know how the software development stuff goes and it sounds like you have a good approach and momentum. Keep it going because I have always thought WordPress would be a great framework for a simple to use LMS, and I look forward to using it for training of volunteers for a couple of groups I work with. There is a need out there for it.

    I have also been playing with a open source LMS called Instructure Canvas. https://github.com/instructure/canvas-lms

  6. As such wordpress is good LMS but not perfect one when it compared with LMS like Moodle and Blackboard. As WordPress is not designed as LMS it takes hard to tackle with it.

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