The Biggest Flaw with Articulate Rise

Last year Articulate unveiled a new offering (or several new offerings to be more accurate) under the umbrella of “Articulate360”.

The entire presentation is quite impressive. This presentation is equally matched by the updates they made to their line of products.

For years Articulate has been known for Articulate Studio, Articulate Storyline, and a smattering of other tools designed to make it easier for elearning developers to create their courses.

They now introduced an exciting mobile learning component in Articulate Rise and it looks great… or at least it looks great on the surface.

You see, from a visual standpoint the platform looks great, and if it is anything like other Articulate products then the learning curve will be quite minimal. But when you look under the hood you might be shocked at what you see (I know I was).

Rise was released without Tin Can API (xAPI) support – an industry standard for reporting. Instead, they opted to only support the rather dated SCORM protocol.

This is a big deal.

It’s a big deal because the industry adoption of Tin Can API has been an uphill battle given how firmly SCORM has been entrenched in the market. When one of the largest industry players neglects Tin Can API for their newest offering it does the elearning industry a huge disservice.

I couldn’t find anywhere that indicates Tin Can API is on the Rise roadmap (if you happen to know where it is then please post it in the comments), but it’s silly that it’s not included from the get-go to be honest.

I can’t help but wonder: why release a cutting-edge tool that neglects cutting-edge reporting technology?

Author

Justin Ferriman is the co-founder and CEO of LearnDash, the WordPress LMS trusted by the world's leading organizations, such as the University of Michigan, Digital Marketer, WPEngine, and Infusionsoft. Justin has made a career as an elearning consultant where he has implemented large-scale training programs for Fortune 500 companies. Twitter | LinkedIn

4 Responses

  1. It’s not good. I agree with you Justin. Tin Can is a big leap forward and badly needed from a learning metric point of view. It creates a divide in the eLearning industry because of Articulates size and influence.

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