Everyday we are asked questions relating to the supported media in LearnDash as people look to make robust online training content.

And often we are asked about ways to use PowerPoint for elearning course content.

Now, there are many ways you can integrate PowerPoint into any elearning program.

It can be a simple PDF that someone interacts with, or you could use a program like Articulate Presenter to transform that presentation into an interactive, online asset.

But what if you just need something “in between”? You don’t have the resources to invest in a program like Articulate, but you want more from your presentation than a rather static PDF.

Well, one possible option is to record yourself giving the presentation. Using a free tool like Screencast-o-Matic allows you to record your screen and then instantly save the video locally or upload to a platform like YouTube.

But this isn’t always ideal either.

Easy PowerPoint to Video Option

I must admit that despite keeping pretty close tabs on all that is happening in the elearning industry, this particular tool wasn’t on my radar.

I actually stumbled upon it as I was doing some research on content authoring tools. Specifically, I was on the iSpring site when I came across one of their offerings called SlideAlloy.

Strange name, but the functionality is pretty neat.

This product is an add-on for PowerPoint. As you can see in the image above, it adds an extra tab to your options.

Without getting into the various technical components, the functionality is pretty straight-forward: SlideAlloy will publish your presentation (saving all animations and/or sounds) and put it onto YouTube as a video, which in turn you can use as an asset in your online training programs.

One license is priced at $97 so it’s not going to break the bank by any means.

The potential time this could save might be worth the price alone. For more information on SlideAllow, head on over to the iSpring site where you can watch a demonstration video.

Justin Ferriman photo

About Justin Ferriman

Justin Ferriman is the co-founder and CEO of LearnDash, the WordPress LMS trusted by Fortune 500 companies, major universities, training organizations, and entrepreneurs worldwide for creating (and selling) their online courses. Justin's Homepage | Twitter

Posted in

Comments

6 responses

Leave a Comment

Ho Justin,

I think Powerpoint 2013 and higer, can do this already. I’m not sure, can’t check, I’ve powerpoint 2010.

wilcoReply

Thanks for the tip, will need to check it out.

Hi Justin,

Can be done with Powerpoint 2010, but little more difficult and only into mwv-file. You will need to click on “Export,” then click on “Create a video.”

Powerpoint 2013 makes it easier and makes mp4-files. Just “Save as” and choose MPEG-4 Video (*.MP4).

This year I’ve seen a lot of people selling video-animations made with Powerpoint 2013. Iff you open them in Powerpoint 2010 not all the layers and functions will work.

I didn’t investigate SlideAlloy, so I don’t know iff it offers more then Powerpoint already has.

WilcoReply

PowerPoint 2013 has a FREE Microsoft add-in called Office Mix.
You can use Windows 7/8/8.1 and PowerPoint 2013 (or Office 365) to create a video using your PowerPoint, or you can create a special type of file from your PowerPoint that you can link to, that you can add quiz questions, annotations, polls, etc and get student responses/analytic’s.

Here’s the Office Mix web site, where you can download the add-in: https://mix.office.com/.
Here’s a blog post I wrote about it for our faculty/students, with a handout and more Office Mix resource links: http://durhamtechsakai.blogspot.com/2015/11/favorite-fall-interactive-tool-office.html

Hello, thank you for the review! Please correct the typo in the last line where the product name is spelled incorrectly. Also, there is a Screen Capture product made by iSpring that also can record PowerPoint and other software simulations http://www.ispringsolutions.com/ispring-cam

And yes, you can save PPT as a video right in PowerPoint, with very few settings, however.

Like others have said, PowerPoint (from 2010 onwards) can do this natively, no fancy add-in or screen recorder needed (except to edit the output video).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Your course could already be online!

We offer a 30 day money-back guarantee and have a world class community to help you get your course online today!

See LearnDash in action. Online Demo

[i]
[i]