How Flipped Classrooms Work

flipped-classroom1Flipped classrooms are becoming more popular in the education system as teachers look for new ways to present content, and for better ways to utilize live classroom time.

Instead of focusing on lectures, class time in a flipped classroom is dedicated to some form of activity designed to get the students applying the concepts they are learning.

To make this happen, flipped classrooms need some form of learning management system in place.

While this can sound intimidating to some, using a WordPress LMS like LearnDash makes it easy to get everything set-up. You literally only need a WordPress site and you’re well on your way.

The point of the LMS is to store and deliver the learning content to the students. For example, you create a course that covers a certain subject. The lessons of that course contain videos and documents for the students to review outside of normal class hours (as homework).

If you want, you can even add a quiz to the content to ensure that students are understanding, which is also a great way to monitor who may need more assistance during class time.

There are many benefits to the flipped classroom approach, some of which include:

  • Better teacher and student relationships
  • More student engagement during class time
  • Allows for special attention to be spent with struggling students
  • Students are given the freedom to learn independently
  • Teacher can better facilitate the understanding of the content

It’s important to note that not all lessons need to be presented in this manner. If you’re just starting out, pick one particular subject and try flipping the content delivery.

To prepare, just set-up your WordPress learning management system, add your content, track progress, and administer the exercise in class. Afterwards you can poll the students on their reaction to this method and expand from there as needed to other subjects.

Reference:
Bill Tucker “The Flipped Classroom”, Education Next, Winter 2012
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About the Author:

Justin Ferriman is the co-founder and CEO of LearnDash, the WordPress LMS trusted by the world's leading organizations, such as the University of Michigan, Digital Marketer, WPEngine, and Infusionsoft. Justin has made a career as an elearning consultant where he has implemented large-scale training programs for Fortune 500 companies. Twitter | LinkedIn

5 Comments
  1. This article is good but it doesn’t give many examples of flipped classes. Just one really. It would be improved if you brought more real life examples tot this article.e,g in ” Instead of focusing on lectures, class time in a flipped classroom is dedicated to some form of activity designed to get the students applying the concepts they are learning.” Some form of activity doesn’t tell us much and this is the whole point of the article to explain what some form of activity is.
    Thanks

  2. Hi Justin

    I’m very much with you on this concept. One word that I don’t see used that often when presenting this approach is “provenance”. One thing you are doing when linking together a number of resources, especially external resources from YouTube etc., in a structured LMS is saying that you have checked out these resources and you believe they will help the learners to achieve their goals in a particular course. Once they have worked through those resources and quizzes at their own pace they are ready for you to develop and apply that information “in class”.

    If you simply say to “your class” – go and browse the internet and see what you can discover on a subject, you will be having them waste so much time with no guarantee that they have found good, or indeed factually correct, information. Packaging a variety of resources (ideally a mix of media, video, audio, reading, games) into an LMS with quizzes give learners and teachers some comfort, plus a record of progress being made.

    This approach has been used for quite some time in the commercial world (schools too!). Going back as far as the early 1980s, we put together a programme for a US white goods giant – learning was done online (supercomputer networks at that time), and then local trainers around the globe would run workshops where the learners were able to build on and practice that knowledge.

    In another company we took that a stage further with the learners making presentations based on their learning to their peer groups and those presentations captured and used to enhance the actual online material.

    Today, working with a large European technology company, we deliver two level training courses online with the backend of the second level being a one and a half day workshop, delivered in countries around the world and via live videolink, where experts come face to face with the learners who are challenged on their knowledge and also get the opportunity to put their knowledge into practice.

  3. jeff nye

    Just a typo in the second to last paragraph.

    “starting” not “staring”
    It’s important to note that not all lessons need to be presented in this manner. If you’re just ***staring out, pick one particular subject and try flipping the content delivery.

    Thanks for the post Justin.

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